Posts Tagged ‘Adam Crapser’

Sadness, Certificate of Citizenship

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017

A 42-year-old Korean adoptee who was deported in 2012 was found dead in Korea, an apparent suicide. Phillip Clay was adopted at age 10, and his adoptive parents never secured his US citizenship. There is so much about this story by You Soo-sun in The Korea Times that is devastating and sad. One particularly devastating detail is that Phillip Clay was sent back to a country where he knew no one, probably did not speak the language, and lacked necessary and vital support.  (You may recall the case of Adam Crapser, also deported to Korea, who is quoted in the article.)

As noted here many times, US citizenship is not always automatic for people who are adopted. Only a Certificate of Citizenship proves citizenship.
Thank you to my friend Sveta, who lives in Korea, for sending me this link.

May Phillip Clay rest in peace.~

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Adam Crapser update

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

As Korean adoptee Adam Crapser awaits deportation, his birth mother in Yeonggju, South Korea prepares to welcome him home.

From the November 16 article by Choe Sang-Hun in the New York Times:

YEONGJU, South Korea — Kwon Pil-ju is trying desperately to teach herself English before she is reunited in the coming weeks with a son she sent away almost 40 years ago.

“I have so much to tell him, especially how sorry I am,” she said, sitting in her bedroom, which doubles as her kitchen, in her one-floor rural home in Yeongju. “But I am at a loss, because I don’t know English and he can’t speak Korean.”

Her son is Adam Crapser, 41, a Korean adoptee who is awaiting deportation from an immigration detention center in Washington State because he lacks American citizenship, even though he has lived in the United States since he was 3 years old. Last month, an immigration court denied his final request to stay in the United States.

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South Koreans have lamented their country’s international reputation as a leading baby exporter. But in a society that held deep prejudices against single mothers and children born outside marriage, and that shunned domestic adoptions, sending children abroad was often the best option for poor South Korean women. Adoption agencies solicited their babies, promising better lives abroad.

In recent years, however, some have returned to South Korea as adults, reporting adoptions gone wrong.

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Adam Crapser update and COC

Thursday, October 27th, 2016

Update on the case of Adam Crapser, the 40-year-old man adopted from South Korea to the US at age three and facing deportation. The attorney representing Crapser, Lori Walls, told NBC Nightly News that this week an immigration judge ruled against Crapser, and his deportation is imminent. Said Walls: “He was eligible for a discretionary form of relief called ‘cancellation of removal,’ and the immigration judge decided he did not deserve this relief…He will be deported as soon as Immigration and Customs Enforcement makes the necessary arrangements.”

As you recall, Adam Crapser was convicted of a felony, and because he does not possess a Certificate of Citizenship–his adoptive parents never applied for one–Crapser is not legally a US citizen.

I’ve written in the past about the absolute importance of securing a Certificate of Citizenship, in Certificate of Citizenship, Now More Than Ever; Certificate of Citizenship; Certificate of Citizenship, Again; and A Mother’s Rights.  Please do not delay. ~

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